Cyber sex hookups

And she did: On JDate, Match.com, and ­e Harmony, she met guys who were six inches shorter or 30 pounds heavier than advertised; who picked expensive restaurants and passed the check to her; and who told her, mid drink, that they were married.

One night, after another bad match and a solo bottle of wine, Webb rejoined JDate—this time posing as a man, to check out her competition. Webb crafted 10 male profiles so perfect they had to be fake (sample code name: Jewish Doc1000) to gather data: what the site's most popular women looked like, which keywords they used, how they timed their messages.

"It's like being in more than one social circle." She suggests joining one mainstream site (say, e Harmony or Match.com) as well as one niche service, such as Cupidtino, which brings Apple-product obsessives together, or the unapologetically elitist Sparkology (the site's men—but not its women! "Changing sites from time to time, and then revisiting, is the best strategy," says Davis. Ace Your Profile"Your user name is going to inspire them to click," says Davis, who suggests a terminology mash-up (e.g., Sporty Smile).

The matchmaking company Feeld has created a new feature to help people hookup with their office crush.

Originally marketed as '3nder', the app was touted as the 'Tinder for threesomes' when it was first released in 2014.

According to its website, 3nder, pronounced 'threen-der', was geared towards 'all swingers, newbies, curious and experienced' who are 'discriminated by society the same way gay people were 15 years ago'.

Aiming to short-circuit this cycle, "e-flirt expert" Laurie Davis' hyperprescriptive (Atria) instructs us in a level of detail that is by turns grating and illuminating on how we should be "marketing our singledom." Here, the authors' best advice on joining—and enjoying—the mixer:1.

Play the Field"It's important to be in more than one community," Davis says.

The app, which bore the tagline: 'Threesomes made easy,' didn't work out, and now the company has re-branded and focused its attention on love in the office.

Feeld advises users of the bizarre bot to 'be nice/don't be a D' and all will be fine.

Washington Post journalist Mike Madden was left surprised when his team were sent Slack messages via the dating bot.

Finding a local hookup has never been this easy to do with your smartphone!

In the marvelously titled (Current), writer Dan Slater tracks a phenomenon that started in 1965 with "computer dating"—essentially a digital compatibility test, dreamed up by two lovelorn Harvard undergrads desperate to meet Radcliffe girls—and mushroomed into an estimated billion a year industry.