Local online adult dating Dating for people with mental health problems

I was checking out a guy’s profile on a dating site. If you’ve never had any mental illness, who wants to date a crazy person?He was nerdy, clean-cut, and very easy on the eyes. Many people think of mental illness in extremes and stereotypes, i.e., depressed people never get out of bed or those with OCD will never leave the bathroom.Do you want to date someone that thinks therapy is useless?

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During my life, in times in which my mental health has been better, I have somehow managed to have two “proper” relationships thus far, both of which it can be argued ended either because my mental health problems were actively getting worse or because they simply became too overwhelming for my partner (which was totally understandable in both situations.) I guess in a way it is good that the main reason for both of my relationships collapsing is centred around an illness because at least an illness can be cured and could potentially disappear one day.

Had the problem been a weird habit of belting out ABBA’s greatest hits in my sleep, that would perhaps be more frustrating, as to my knowledge there is no cure for that kind of thing.

The site — True — was launched last year by an Albuquerque social worker to help people like Lynne find healthy relationships. "The Web site, because it caters to people with mental illness, you go in knowing that up front," Lynne said. You don't feel threatened by what the other person might think." Lynne was married once, briefly.

• Click here for FOXNews.com's Personal Technology Center. But relationships were more likely to aggravate her mental problems than improve them.

When my single friends give a character assassination of a former flame, there's one phrase I hear a lot: 'They turned out to be a psycho . .' Of course I understand the sentiment, but the words make me prickle, as the same could possibly be said of me.

You see, eight years ago, at the age of 23, I was diagnosed with paranoid psychosis.Every week, I sit on my therapist’s couch to discuss life, and I’m open about this with many people. Up to 3% of Americans deal with dysthymia every year. Many are dating or looking for a romantic relationship.But when looking for a serious romantic partner, those of us with a mental illness walk a tricky tightrope.Even better, we seemed to have a “high-match percent.” To be sure, I checked some of the questions he answered, just in case. As someone who lives with dysthymia, or persistent mild depression, I struggle against this stigma.In the morning I wake up and take a pill to help with my anxiety. Most of us pay our bills and rarely stand out of the crowd.But, for Lynne, who was diagnosed with depression, anxiety and other mental disorders at 19, dating invariably ends in disaster.