Passwords for dating websites

Hackers broke into the database for a military dating Web site and stole passwords, e-mail addresses, and other information from nearly 171,000 accounts, according to a post on the Pastebin site this weekend: "The website was recently closed day ago or so, so we dumped email db," the hackers said in their post.

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The full list of sites can be found on this Cupid Media page under the "Choose a site" drop-down menu.

If you've ever registered on any of those sites, change your password immediately on that site and on any other sites on which you may have used the same password.

The group was reportedly brought down by one of their own, known as "Sabu," who had apparently been working as an informant since last summer when he pleaded guilty to computer hacking conspiracy and other charges. are aware of the claim that someone has hacked Military and are currently investigating the situation.

At this time there is no actual evidence that Military was hacked and it is possible that the Tweet from Operation Digiturk is simply a false claim.

Adobe, as Krebs reminds us, found it necessary to alert only 38 million active users, though the number of stolen emails and passwords reached the lofty heights of 150 million records.

More relevant than arguments about data-set size is the fact that Cupid Media claims to have learned from the breach and is now seeing the light as far as encryption, hashing and salting goes, as Bolton told Krebs: Subsequently to the events of January we hired external consultants and implemented a range of security improvements which include hashing and salting of our passwords.It has verified that 498 of those credentials linked back to Mate1 accounts.However, spelling errors and the absence of an email verification system by which a Mate1 user must click a link to activate their account might mean that many of the compromised email accounts either belong to people who actually do not own them or do not function properly.Joseph Cox of , reports that the passwords are believed to have belonged to members of Mate1, an online dating website with an estimated membership base of 36.5 million users.In a conversation with Cox the anonymous hacker described how he had control over Mate1's systems: was able to obtain approximately 500 of the leaked passwords.Every one of the 42 million Cupid Media passwords was stored in unencrypted plain text.